Quick Answer: Whom when to use?

How do you use whom in a sentence examples?

Examples of “whom” in a sentence:

  • He saw the faces of those whom he loved at his birthday celebration.
  • She saw a lady whom she presumed worked at the store, and she asked her a question.
  • Here dwells an old woman with whom I would like to converse.

What is the difference who and whom?

“Who” and is a subjective pronoun. “Whom” is an objective pronoun. That simply means that “who” is always subject to a verb, and that “whom” is always working as an object in a sentence. “Who,” the subjective pronoun, is the doer of an action.

How do you use both of whom?

To use to whom both in your sentence: Coffee was paid for by John and Anna, to whom both I and my companion express sincere gratitude. It could not be “to whom both”.

Who I miss or whom I miss?

Who we Miss or Whom we Miss? Whom we miss is correct, not who we miss. Who refers to the subject while whom refers to the object of the preposition or verb.

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Should I use who or whom?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

What is whom an example of?

Whom is formal English and is used instead of “who” when the sentence is referring to an object pronoun and not when the sentence is referring to a subject pronoun such as he or she. An example of whom is someone asking which person someone is speaking to, “To whom are you speaking?”

Who am I speaking with or whom?

Since the person with whom you are speaking is the object, the correct way to ask is “With whom am I speaking” or ” Whom am I speaking with” Prepositons are preferably not used at the end of a sentence. “To whom am I speaking ” is wrong as far as the preposition is concerned.

Who is he or who is him?

Pronouns: personal (I, me, you, him, it, they, etc.)

subject object person
he him third
she her third
it it third
we us first

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Who do I look like or whom do I look like?

Whom do you like?” is correct. “Who do you like,” though ungrammatical, is used much more commonly. Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he” or “’she,” use who.

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Is both of whom correct grammar?

The words “who” and “whomare both pronouns. That is, a word that takes the place of a noun—in this case a person. Use “who” or “whom” depending on whether you are referring to a subject or an object in a sentence: The subject of a sentence is the person or thing doing the action.

Is all of whom correct?

You are correct, it should be “whom“. By the traditional rules, “who” is used for subjects and “whom” for objects. But when you say “all of whom were picked”, the subject is “all“, not “who” or “whom“. “Whom” is the object of the preposition “of”.

Is subject or subjected?

subjected to’ means that an act was actually performed. ‘subject to’ means that the legal situation allows the act to be performed on them.

Can you use whom with plural?

Whom is a pronoun that replaces the singular or plural object of a sentence. Whom can be used in a question or a statement. With a direct object, a preposition isn’t necessary.

Can which be used for a person?

Using “Which,” “Who,” and “That”

“Who” is used for people. “Which” is used for things, and “that” can be used for either. (Note, however, that using “that” for people is considered informal.)

Who or whom should we invite to the party?

You use “who” when you are talking about the subject, and you use “whom” when you are talking about the object. A good rule of thumb is if you can replace “who/whom” with “he”, then it’s the subject, and if you can replace it with “him” then it’s the object.

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