Quick Answer: When was the last time republicans controlled congress?

Who controlled Congress in 2017?

115th United States Congress
Members 100 senators 435 representatives 6 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Republican
Senate President Joe Biden (D) (until January 20, 2017) Mike Pence (R) (from January 20, 2017)
House Majority Republican

Who had control of Congress in 2008?

The apportionment of seats in the House was based on the 2000 U.S. Census. In the November 2008 elections, the Democratic Party increased its majorities in both chambers, giving President Obama a Democratic majority in the legislature for the first two years of his presidency.

Who controlled the House in 2016?

2016 United States House of Representatives elections

Leader Paul Ryan Nancy Pelosi
Party Republican Democratic
Leader since October 29, 2015 January 3, 2003
Leader’s seat Wisconsin 1st California 12th
Last election 247 seats, 51.2% 188 seats, 45.5%

Who controlled Congress in 2006?

November 7, 2006 — California Representative Nancy Pelosi and Nevada Senator Harry Reid lead the Democratic Party in taking control of both the House and the Senate in the 2006 congressional elections, the first time in 12 years the Democrats secure control of both houses of Congress simultaneously.

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Which party controlled the Senate in 2016?

2016 United States Senate elections

Leader Mitch McConnell Harry Reid (retired)
Party Republican Democratic
Leader’s seat Kentucky Nevada
Seats before 54 44
Seats after 52 46

How many Democrats are in Congress 2017?

In the House of Representatives, there are 238 Republicans (including 1 Delegate and the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico), 201 Democrats (including 4 Delegates), and 5 vacant seats. The Senate has 51 Republicans, 47 Democrats, and 2 Independents, who both caucus with the Democrats.

Has any party ever had a supermajority in the Senate?

It was the first time either party held a filibuster-proof 60% super majority in both the Senate and House chambers since the 89th United States Congress in 1965, and last time until the 111th United States Congress in 2009.

Who had Senate majority in 2008?

2008 United States Senate elections

Leader Harry Reid Mitch McConnell
Party Democratic Republican
Leader’s seat Nevada Kentucky
Seats before 49 49
Seats after 57 41

Who controlled Congress in 2012?

112th United States Congress
Senate Majority Democratic
Senate President Joe Biden (D)
House Majority Republican
House Speaker John Boehner (R)

Who controlled the House and Senate in 2013?

113th United States Congress
Senate Majority Democratic
Senate President Joe Biden (D)
House Majority Republican
House Speaker John Boehner (R)

Who controlled the House in 2010?

Republicans won the nationwide popular vote for the House of Representatives by a margin of 6.8 points and picked up 63 seats, taking control of the chamber for the first time since the 2006 elections.

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Who was the House majority leader in 2016?

Majority Leaders of the House (1899 to present)

Congress and Years Name Party
113th (2013–2015) MCCARTHY, Kevin 13 Republican
114th (2015–2017) MCCARTHY, Kevin Republican
115th (2017–2019) MCCARTHY, Kevin Republican
116th (2019–2021) HOYER, Steny Hamilton Democrat

Who ran the House in 2006?

2006 United States House of Representatives elections

Leader Nancy Pelosi Dennis Hastert
Party Democratic Republican
Leader since January 3, 2003 January 3, 1999
Leader’s seat California 8th Illinois 14th
Last election 202 232

Who controlled the Senate in 2007?

110th United States Congress
Members 100 senators 435 representatives 5 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Democratic
Senate President Dick Cheney (R)
House Majority Democratic

Who controlled the House and Senate in 2009?

Democrats controlled the 111th Congress (2009–2011) with majorities in both houses of Congress alongside the country’s first African-American president, Democrat Barack Obama.

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