Question: When to use me?

What is the rule for using I or me in a sentence?

Use the pronoun “I” when the person speaking is doing the action, either alone or with someone else. Use the pronoun “me” when the person speaking is receiving the action of the verb in some way, either directly or indirectly.

Do you say me and John or John and I?

So, it’s correct to sayJohn and me‘ or ‘my family and I’, not ‘me and John‘ or ‘I and my family’. The correct answer would be: “John and I”. The two personal pronouns I and me are often used wrongly, usually in sentences in which I is being used with another noun.

Which is correct Sally and me or Sally and I?

If this phrase is the subject, then it’s “Sally and I.” If it’s an object, then it’s “Sally and me.” Another way to keep them straight is to think about which first person plural pronoun you would use. If you would use “we,” then it’s “Sally and I;” if you would use “us,” then it’s “Sally and me.”

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Are or am grammar?

Are is the plural form of the verb to be. Am is the first person form of the verb to be. Are is used for plural subjects, whereas am is used for singular subjects. Jim, John, and I is a plural subject (3 people), so the correct form is “Jim, John, and I are going somewhere.”

Why is me and my friend wrong?

You should use you and I when this acts as a subject and me and you when this acts as an object. The first half of your second example isn’t wrong because of the word order (ie Me and my friends vs My friends and me) it is wrong because me can’t be the subject of the sentence.

Can I say me and my friend?

My Friend and Me or My Friend and I

My friend and I or my friend and me? The answer is it depends. “My friend and I” would be the subject of the sentence whereas we saymy friend and me” when it is the object.

Is it correct to say me and my sister?

The phrase “me and my sister” is incorrect. If it is the object of a sentence, the correct wording should be “my sister and me.” Example: “My mother gave my sister and me a present.” In both cases, it is traditional to put the other person’s name or personal pronoun before your own.

Does me come first in a sentence?

And now let’s consider the other pronouns such as “you” and “her.” The AP Stylebook says the order doesn’t matter when you’re mixing these pronouns with nouns, but I tend to put the pronoun first. Always put the pronouns “me,” “my,” and “I” last in a list.

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Which is correct Bob and I or Bob and me?

The rule here is very simple: the correct word is the one you’d use if there were no “Bob” involved — so “I went to the store” becomes “Bob and I went to the store,” and “She kissed me” becomes “She kissed Bob and me.”

Which is correct my wife and me or my wife and I?

It should have been “My daughter told my wife and I.” Sorry, dear readers, but in this case “my wife and me” is correct. “I” and “me” are personal pronouns. “I” is used when the pronoun is the subject of the sentence.

Is it Kathy and me or Kathy and I?

If you’re talking about a compound subject (as opposed to object), the correct phrase is “Kathy and I”: Kathy and I told them. If me is used as a subject, it doesn’t really matter which way you decide to be wrong.

Why do we say aren’t i instead of Amn t I?

The reason is that pronunciation beats grammar and spelling in popular spoken abbreviations, so amn’t was long ago changed to the easier-to-say aren’t. It’s even easier to say ain’t, but we seem to have consigned that to slang usage.

Why do we say aren’t I?

Aren’t I‘ was considered an error for much of the 20th century. These days, it’s widely accepted. What happened? Aren’t I is an accepted phrase for “am I not” even though when the conjunction is broken down it appears to be short for “are not I,” which doesn’t agree with standard rules of grammar.

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Which is correct AMN T I or aren’t I?

(“Amn’t” is not a word in English.) Therefore, in casual speech and writing, English speakers use aren’t, instead, and except in formal situations, this is considered entirely grammatical.

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